English To Myanmar Dictionary

english to myanmar dictionary

    dictionary

  • A reference book on any subject, the items of which are arranged in alphabetical order
  • An associative array (also associative container, map, mapping, dictionary, finite map, and in query-processing an index or index file) is an abstract data type composed of a collection of unique keys and a collection of values, where each key is associated with one value (or set of values).
  • A book that lists the words of a language in alphabetical order and gives their meaning, or that gives the equivalent words in a different language
  • a reference book containing an alphabetical list of words with information about them
  • A dictionary, also referred to as a lexicon, wordbook, or vocabulary, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often listed alphabetically, with usage information, definitions, etymologies, phonetics, pronunciations, and other information;Webster’s New World College Dictionary

    english

  • of or relating to or characteristic of England or its culture or people; “English history”; “the English landed aristocracy”; “English literature”
  • an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
  • Of or relating to England or its people or language
  • the people of England

    myanmar

  • Burma, officially the Union of Myanmar, is the largest country by geographical area in mainland Southeast Asia.
  • a mountainous republic in southeastern Asia on the Bay of Bengal; “much opium is grown in Myanmar”
  • Oilsticks: The Burmese also refer the basic Chinese way of preparing youtiao. These breadsticks are mostly eaten after dipping in a cup of tea or coffee.

english to myanmar dictionary – D-8 Burmese

D-8 Burmese (Myanmar) English, English Burmese (Myanmar) Electronic Speaking Translator Pocket Dictionary.
D-8 Burmese (Myanmar) English, English Burmese (Myanmar) Electronic Speaking Translator Pocket Dictionary.
Burmese (Myanmar) is displayed with both Burmese (Myanmar) letters and English letters.. It is best for learners, travelers and business people regardless of your proficiency.. It runs fully autonomously, no internet connection is necessary and can therefore be used at any time & anywhere. The Phrasebook covers thousands of words, phrases, idioms, grammars and sentence patterns. and vast majority of topics everyday expressions to specific phrases e.g. tourism, health, business, laws, technology or military etc.

Ambassador Dr. G. P. Malalasekera

Ambassador Dr. G. P. Malalasekera
The 30th death anniversary of Dr. G. P. Malalasekera, scholar, professor, Buddhist leader and diplomat, fell on April 23. His excellent store-house of knowledge regarding Pali, Buddhism, Buddhist Civilisation, not to mention English, Latin, Greek and french languages, was unique.
Dr. G. P. Malalasekera

Born on November 8, 1899 at Malamulla, Panadura, his father was a well-known Ayurvedic physician, Ayur. Dr. M. S. Pieris Malalasekera.

As a school boy, young George Pieris Malalasekera as he was known then, was sent to St. John’s College, Panadura, for his English education. It was a leading college in the English medium under the principalship of Cyril Jansz, an educationist of repute during the colonial era.

At present it is named after him as a mark of respect – Cyril Jansz Vidyalaya. After receiving his education in that school from 1907-17, he joined the Medical College, Colombo to qualify as a doctor with the then diploma – L.M.S. (Licentiate in Medicine and Surgery, equivalent to the present degree of M.B.B.S).

The death of his father cut short his medical studies. Circumstances compelled him to give up his hopes of becoming a medical doctor. By following a correspondence course from England, he passed the B.A. (London) examination, 1919 externally in the first division. His subjects were English, Latin, Greek and French. He was the youngest candidate to obtain the Bachelor of Arts degree in the British empire in that year with a first class.

Coming under the influence of Buddhist renaissance of Srimath Angarika Dharmapala, he changed his foreign names of George and Pieris to those of Gunapala Piyasena and henceforth came to be known as G. P. (Gunapala Piyasena) Malalasekera. He took to teaching at Ananda College, Colombo, with his B.A. (London) under the principalship of P. de S. Kularatne. Both of them were the architects of the Sinhala national costume.

In quick succession Malalasekera rose up to be the Vice Principal and acting Principal of Ananda. In 1923, he proceeded to join the University of London and obtained the two post-graduate degrees of M.A. and Ph.D simultaneously in 1925, in oriental languages majoring in Pali.

His thesis was ‘Pali Literature in Sri Lanka’. On his return to the motherland in 1926, he was appointed Principal of Nalanda Vidyalaya, Colombo.

Shortly afterwards, he succeeded Ven. Suriyagoda as lecturer in the then University College, Colombo to lecture in English on Sinhala, Pali and Sanskrit for the London degree examinations. When the University of Ceylon was founded in 1942, he became the Professor of Sinhala, Pali, Sanskrit and Buddhist Civilisation. In course of time he was the Dean, Faculty of Oriental Studies and Editor-in-Chief of the Buddhist Encylopaedia. His research on Buddhism and Buddhist Civilisation is a class by itself – excellent – locally and abroad.

His contribution by way of research papers and publications to the Pali Text Society of London under the distinguished patronage of scholars like Rhys David and Miss I. B. Harner are stupendous, voluminous and highly knowledgable. From 1927 twice he was elected the Joint Secretary of the All Ceylon Buddhist Congress. Thrice he was the Vice-President and functioned as its President from 1939-1957.

During his tenure of office, he saw to it that this congress got constructed a magnificent-storeyed building for its headquarters at Bauddhaloka Mawatha, Colombo-7. He took a delight in the activities of the Viharamahadevi Girls’ Home, Biyagama and was responsible for the establishment of boys’ homes at Panadura and Ja-Ela. During his presidency of the Buddhist Congress for 25 years, he was fortunate to address 20 of its annual sessions. His ‘magnum opus’ or great work is the famous ‘Gunapala Sinhala-English Dictionary’. Of equal importance is the Pali dictionary – Sinhala-English. An ardent member of the Ceylon Asiatic Society, he was conferred honorary degrees from the reputed universities in the UK, France, Cambodia and Myanmar (Burma). He represented our country at several parleys abroad notably, Conference on Living Religions (1924 – London), Conference on World Religious (1936 – London), Association of Occidental (Western) and Oriental Philosophers (Hawaii – 1949), Association of Indian Philosophers – India, meeting of the Pakistani Philosophers (1953 – Karachi), and the Seminar on Religions for Peace, (San Francisco, USA, 1965). So numerous were the essays, write-ups, literary contributions he made and radio talks delivered over Buddhist, religious and cultural matters and Social service assignments. He was the founder president of the World Fellowship of Buddhists inaugurated within the hallowed precincts of the ‘Sri Dalada Maligawa’ (Temple of The Tooth Relic) Kandy in 1950 at the suggestion of the All Ceylon Buddhist Congress.

From 1950-58, he held that exalted position in that internationally famous institution. Dr. Malalasekera was appointed the first High Commissioner for Sri Lanka

The Always Is Remember

The Always Is Remember
This is dedicated to a very special friend "Marlit" whom I met on Ko Phi Phi Island in the summer of 2002.

Marlit came from Burma to find some work Thailand.
This is where I met him, on Ko Phi-Phi Island. He lived in a beach shack with a Tribal/Chinese-1/2 Thai /Christian Man named George.
Marlit has a difficult life as most the civilians do in Burma.
He had to escape his country just to find work so he could feed his family.

I just want you to know Marlit that I remember you.. And I’ll never forget the time on our last day together when you handed me a slip of paper that had 4 words on it – you translated it from your burmese to english dictionary. It said, "The Always is Remember".
Well my friend I remember you.
I hope you and your family are in the best of spirits for I know you need my prayers.
So I send you a gift that you gave Me long ago.. I DO Remember!

I will not be sad, instead I will be hopeful because I will always remember you..
and I send only positivity your way. May GOD be with you in these tough times my friend…

english to myanmar dictionary

Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar) (Historical Dictionaries of Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East)
Burma (Myanmar) is a country in crisis, and a political resolution to its problems of national unity seems unlikely to occur in the near future. The purpose of the Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar) is to explain in depth the country’s political crisis, while also providing detailed historical background. While paying much attention to the personalities and events of the 1962-1988 Burma Socialist Programme Party (BSPP) period, the dictionary focuses on the events, institutions, and personalities of 1988, when a nationwide movement for democracy resulted in the collapse of the BSPP regime, and the post-1988 period, when Burma was ruled by a military junta, the State Law and Order Restoration Council, which, after 1997, changed its name to the State Peace and Development Council.

Through the use of maps, a list of acronyms, a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on important persons, places, and events as well as political, economic, and social background, the history of this country is unfolded. Everything from major figures such as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, whose non-violent struggle for democracy won her the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, to the issue of economic sanctions versus “constructive engagement” is discussed in this important resource.

Burma (Myanmar) is a country in crisis, and a political resolution to its problems of national unity seems unlikely to occur in the near future. The purpose of the Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar) is to explain in depth the country’s political crisis, while also providing detailed historical background. While paying much attention to the personalities and events of the 1962-1988 Burma Socialist Programme Party (BSPP) period, the dictionary focuses on the events, institutions, and personalities of 1988, when a nationwide movement for democracy resulted in the collapse of the BSPP regime, and the post-1988 period, when Burma was ruled by a military junta, the State Law and Order Restoration Council, which, after 1997, changed its name to the State Peace and Development Council.

Through the use of maps, a list of acronyms, a chronology, an introductory essay, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on important persons, places, and events as well as political, economic, and social background, the history of this country is unfolded. Everything from major figures such as Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, whose non-violent struggle for democracy won her the 1991 Nobel Peace Prize, to the issue of economic sanctions versus “constructive engagement” is discussed in this important resource.

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